measuring Broad-based Prosperity™

What Is the Scorecard?

The Orlando Prosperity Scorecard captures a view of the Orlando region before the national economy was brought to a standstill. It serves as a baseline, highlighting the trends that were playing out in an economy that seemed strong by standard measures. It helps us better understand how prosperity has been distributed in Orlando and where barriers to economic mobility linger, even at a time when typical measures of growth suggest economic success.

We invite you to use the Orlando Prosperity Scorecard as a catalyst for aligning your personal and organizational strategies as critical components of the collective action necessary to achieve broad-based prosperity. View the What can you do? section below for more information.

Key Takeaways

  1. The Prosperity Scorecard shows that barriers to workforce participation have been decreasing over time. Orlando has an educated workforce with access to new opportunities being created by a digital economy.  
  2. However, this growth is fragile and has not been enough to propel Orlando forward in rankings among peer metros. Prosperity is not distributed evenly in Orlando when we consider outcomes by race, ethnicity, and gender. The economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic further threatens future prosperity. 

ORLANDO PROSPERITY SCORECARD REPORT

Beyond the Baseline

Learn more about the indicators included in the Prosperity Scorecard and the deeper takeaways from the data analysis by downloading the Beyond The Baseline | Orlando Prosperity Scorecard Report.

Opportunities measure the vibrancy of the regional economy. 

Capabilities indicate the ability of the region’s talent to take advantage of those opportunities – not only from a skills and training perspective, but also personal health. 

Access identifies barriers standing in the way of full participation in the economy.

Through this framework, Broad-based Prosperity™ is an outcome that exists in an economy creating opportunities for all; where regional talent has the capabilities to take advantage of those opportunities, and barriers limiting access to participate in the economy are removed.

*The Orlando Metropolitan area (Orlando Metro) is made up of Lake, Orange, Osceola and Seminole County.

Neighborhood Opportunity Index

The Neighborhood Opportunity Index (NOI), developed by the Polis Institute, complements the Orlando Prosperity Scorecard’s county-wide information by providing searchable access to social and economic data for 1,765 neighborhoods across the seven counties of Central Florida. These metrics complement those in the Orlando Prosperity Scorecard to give a detailed picture of how broad-based prosperity is distributed throughout the Orlando Region. Search the NOI for a neighborhood’s opportunity rank.

how to use the scorecard

What can you do?

We invite you to use the Orlando Prosperity Scorecard as a catalyst for aligning your personal and organizational strategies as critical components of the collective action necessary to achieve broad-based prosperity. The following engagement tiers outline options for learning more about the Scorecard and using it to drive corporate or philanthropic strategies.

Tier III (Pro bono to all regional organizations)

Invited presentations of the Scorecard annually to governance boards and management.

Subscription to a quarterly “Prosperity Scorecard Update” e-mail with highlights of new data, specific to the Scorecard or other relevant research.

Tier II (Pro bono to all regional organizations)

Tier III benefits plus:

Subscription to annual indicator slides or memo for distribution to boards with discussion questions to facilitate deeper engagement and integration of the Scorecard with governance, planning, and management decision making.

Two seats in a bi-annual (virtual) Scorecard orientation session as training for internal staff to institutionalize utilization and understanding of the Scorecard’s insights.

Tier I (Fee-based)

Tier II and III benefits plus:

 

  • Community impact overlay study that models economic impact of community or philanthropic spending with an overlay with the areas of need revealed by the Scorecard—in terms of economic factors and geography. The study’s results and recommendations can be used to prioritize investments and goal setting.

To begin a conversation about utilizing the Scorecard, contact:

Dale A. Brill, Ph.D.

Senior Vice President, Research & Foundation for Orlando’s Future

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